Where is the Skilling Australian Fund levy going?


Since the 12 August 2018, businesses seeking to nominate a candidate under the Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) 482 Visa, they are required to pay the mandatory Skilling Australian Fund (SAF) levy, in addition to the standard visa application fees. The amount the business needs to pay, depends on the type of visa and the annual turnover. The following fees are outlined below, in relation to a TSS Visa.

  • $1,200 per year if the annual turnover of the business is less than $10 million
  • $1,800 per year if the annual turnover is higher than $10 million

Example: for a four-year TSS visa, a business with an annual turnover over $10 million, would need to pay an additional $7,200 in fees.  

The SAF was introduced to address falling apprenticeship numbers across the country, however the underlying questions remains - have governments done enough to assist with the situation to date?

According to the Department of Employment’s website, the government has provided over $330 million to state and territory governments, which is aimed at supporting approximately 80,000 additional apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities. The National Partnership agreement which governs the allocation of funds, states the following industries will benefit from the program:

  • Tourism & Hospitality
  • Health, Ageing, Community and Social Services
  • Engineering
  • Manufacturing
  • Building & Construction
  • Agriculture
  • Digital Technologies

In terms of the delivery of the projects, priority will be provided to:

  • Trade apprenticeships
  • Rural and regional communities
  • Industries experiencing structural adjustments

Whilst there have been positive steps with the program, critics have voiced their concerns over the transparency of funds allocations, and timing of the overall program being signed with relevant states, considering 12 months has since lapsed since the implementation date.

Will there be changes to the program? According to clause E23 of the National Partnership agreement, an independent review will be completed approximately 12 months prior to its expiry, to assess whether changes will need to be implemented. If you or your business is interested with the results of the independent review, our team at Oz Migration will be able to produce findings, to assist businesses understand the actual real funding costs versus projections for various allocations & industries. 

To download the agreement, you are able to refer to the following weblink:

http://www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/content/npa/skills/national-partnership/Skilling_Australians_Fund_NP.pdf

…………………………………..

Written by Robert Lu.

Robert is the Immigration Manager at Oz Migration Solutions. He has been working in the industry for the last 12 years, passionate about immigration and a believer in “Big Australia”.

MARN: 0848586

Should I Engage a Qualified Migration Agent?



Why would I use the services of a Migration Agent to apply for an Australian visa?

Is it possible to apply for a visa by myself?

The short answer is yes – it possible to submit your own visa application but the real question is, should you? To break it down to a more everyday example, it’s a bit like using an Accountant to assist with your tax return. You could do it yourself, but in most cases, the experienced professional will make the process easier, and give you a better chance of getting the best results. Here are five reasons to use a Migration Agent to assist with your visa application:

  1. Expertise: A good Migration Agent should be able to demonstrate broad experience in the immigration industry. They will use their expertise to make sure you are applying for the most appropriate visa type for your individual circumstances. They will then apply their skills and knowledge to ensure that your application has the best possible chance of being approved. If possible, ask around your contacts and see if anyone has a personal recommendation on which Migration Agent to use. Research the Migration Agent and the firm they work for, and read any reviews you can find. And of course, make sure you use an Agent with current MARA registration - more on this below.
  2. Time saving: Visa applications involve a mountain of paperwork, filling in forms and uploading of documents in specific formats. Migration Agents have processes in place to have this done efficiently on your behalf, and once you provide the documents and information they have asked for, they will do all the hard, time-consuming work on the preparation of your application and importantly, will ensure that it is as complete and accurate as possible.
  3. Changes and updates: The Department of Home Affairs constantly reviews and updates their visa processes, and has been known to announce major changes to some visa streams with little or no notice. A registered Migration Agent will be one of the first to know of any changes and will act quickly on your behalf if your matter is affected.
  4. Follow up and communication: Your Migration Agent should handle your case from your initial enquiry, right through until a decision is reached on your case. They should be in contact with you every step of the way and will explain any complex information such as visa conditions. If the Department of Home Affairs has additional questions about your application, they will also be able to guide you through this process.
  5. Trust and Accountability: It is important to be able to trust your Migration Agent completely. All registered Migration Agents in Australia are bound by the Code of Conduct, must have appropriate insurance and must have proven their integrity as a fit and proper person to represent your immigration matter. For more information on the Code of Conduct, and to check that a Migration Agent is registered in Australia, visit www.mara.gov.au

At Oz Migration, all of our Migration Agents have over 10 years of post-qualification experience. Our team of specialists provide both individual and business services in the core areas of:

- Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visas (Subclass 482)
- Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) – Subclass 400 visas
- Permanent residency applications under the Employer Nomination Scheme -
- Subclass 186 visas (company supported)
- Permanent residency applications under Skilled Independent - Subclass 189
(non-company supported)
- Training – Subclass 407 visas
- Investor and Business Owner visas (high net worth individuals)
- Labour hire agreements (arrangements to allow your business to on-hire to third parties and unrelated entities)
- Partner, Parent and family-based visas

If you would like our team to undertake a visa assessment, please do not hesitate to contact our team at: info@ozmigration.net.au

……………………

Written by Caryn Spry.

Caryn is our Migration Co-ordinator, and has a wealth of experience in Human Resources/Global Mobility. Caryn has worked at Oz Migration for 3 years, and previously worked at a well-known global telecommunications company for over 10 years. 


Is migration a key driver to ensure economic prosperity?



The Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) has published a report which explores Australia’s migration program under the Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) 482 Visa, and its predecessor the 457 visas. The report focuses on hot topics, statistical data and interesting facts surrounding the Australian migration program.

How is the report useful? It enables the public to increase their understanding of Australia’s visa system, and assists businesses by promoting predictability & sustainability for the Australian economy. The report also increases the program’s exposure to political settlement, during a time where there has been challenges from both state and federal governments.

Some of the interesting facts taken from the report include:

  • Overall, TSS/457 visa holders tend to earn more than their permanent skilled counterparts and the overall Australian population. 42% earn a salary of $78,000 to $156,000 or more, with the average salary being $95,000. The pragmatists amongst us, would conclude that these skilled migrants, not only increases competition/skills levels amongst the industry, however it also increases the overall salary levels, thus living standards etc. 
  • With an Australian workforce of 12.8 million (data taken from ABS as of June 2019), there is approximately 154,000 (as of March 2019) TSS/457 visa holders. This figure represents less than 1% of the Australian workforce. Two-thirds of these visa holders reside in Sydney & Melbourne, and the top three citizenships are from the United Kingdom, India and the Philippines.
  • Skills shortages remain evident within key sectors. By way of example, CEDA’s research indicates Australia will need 18,000 more Cyber Security Specialists by 2026, when Australia only produces 500 graduates a year. This raises questions, whether segments of the program should be implemented using an individualistic approach, versus collectivism.

Overall, the report is a great read. It provides extrinsic motivations towards shaping Australia’s migration program, and addresses localised insecurities through transparency and non-sensationalism.

To download the full report, please visit:

https://www.ceda.com.au/Research-and-policy/All-CEDA-research/Research-catalogue/Effects-of-temporary-migration

………………………………………………

Written by Robert Lu.

Robert is the Immigration Manager at Oz Migration Solutions. He has been working in the industry for the last 12 years, passionate about immigration and a true believer in “Big Australia”.

MARN: 0848586



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Oz Migration Blogs

Where is the Skilling Australian Fund levy going?


Since the 12 August 2018, businesses seeking to nominate a candidate under the Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) 482 Visa, they are required to pay the mandatory Skilling Australian Fund (SAF) levy, in addition to the standard visa application fees. The amount the business needs to pay, depends on the type of visa and the annual turnover. The following fees are outlined below, in relation to a TSS Visa.

  • $1,200 per year if the annual turnover of the business is less than $10 million
  • $1,800 per year if the annual turnover is higher than $10 million

Example: for a four-year TSS visa, a business with an annual turnover over $10 million, would need to pay an additional $7,200 in fees.  

The SAF was introduced to address falling apprenticeship numbers across the country, however the underlying questions remains - have governments done enough to assist with the situation to date?

According to the Department of Employment’s website, the government has provided over $330 million to state and territory governments, which is aimed at supporting approximately 80,000 additional apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities. The National Partnership agreement which governs the allocation of funds, states the following industries will benefit from the program:

  • Tourism & Hospitality
  • Health, Ageing, Community and Social Services
  • Engineering
  • Manufacturing
  • Building & Construction
  • Agriculture
  • Digital Technologies

In terms of the delivery of the projects, priority will be provided to:

  • Trade apprenticeships
  • Rural and regional communities
  • Industries experiencing structural adjustments

Whilst there have been positive steps with the program, critics have voiced their concerns over the transparency of funds allocations, and timing of the overall program being signed with relevant states, considering 12 months has since lapsed since the implementation date.

Will there be changes to the program? According to clause E23 of the National Partnership agreement, an independent review will be completed approximately 12 months prior to its expiry, to assess whether changes will need to be implemented. If you or your business is interested with the results of the independent review, our team at Oz Migration will be able to produce findings, to assist businesses understand the actual real funding costs versus projections for various allocations & industries. 

To download the agreement, you are able to refer to the following weblink:

http://www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/content/npa/skills/national-partnership/Skilling_Australians_Fund_NP.pdf

…………………………………..

Written by Robert Lu.

Robert is the Immigration Manager at Oz Migration Solutions. He has been working in the industry for the last 12 years, passionate about immigration and a believer in “Big Australia”.

MARN: 0848586

Should I Engage a Qualified Migration Agent?



Why would I use the services of a Migration Agent to apply for an Australian visa?

Is it possible to apply for a visa by myself?

The short answer is yes – it possible to submit your own visa application but the real question is, should you? To break it down to a more everyday example, it’s a bit like using an Accountant to assist with your tax return. You could do it yourself, but in most cases, the experienced professional will make the process easier, and give you a better chance of getting the best results. Here are five reasons to use a Migration Agent to assist with your visa application:

  1. Expertise: A good Migration Agent should be able to demonstrate broad experience in the immigration industry. They will use their expertise to make sure you are applying for the most appropriate visa type for your individual circumstances. They will then apply their skills and knowledge to ensure that your application has the best possible chance of being approved. If possible, ask around your contacts and see if anyone has a personal recommendation on which Migration Agent to use. Research the Migration Agent and the firm they work for, and read any reviews you can find. And of course, make sure you use an Agent with current MARA registration - more on this below.
  2. Time saving: Visa applications involve a mountain of paperwork, filling in forms and uploading of documents in specific formats. Migration Agents have processes in place to have this done efficiently on your behalf, and once you provide the documents and information they have asked for, they will do all the hard, time-consuming work on the preparation of your application and importantly, will ensure that it is as complete and accurate as possible.
  3. Changes and updates: The Department of Home Affairs constantly reviews and updates their visa processes, and has been known to announce major changes to some visa streams with little or no notice. A registered Migration Agent will be one of the first to know of any changes and will act quickly on your behalf if your matter is affected.
  4. Follow up and communication: Your Migration Agent should handle your case from your initial enquiry, right through until a decision is reached on your case. They should be in contact with you every step of the way and will explain any complex information such as visa conditions. If the Department of Home Affairs has additional questions about your application, they will also be able to guide you through this process.
  5. Trust and Accountability: It is important to be able to trust your Migration Agent completely. All registered Migration Agents in Australia are bound by the Code of Conduct, must have appropriate insurance and must have proven their integrity as a fit and proper person to represent your immigration matter. For more information on the Code of Conduct, and to check that a Migration Agent is registered in Australia, visit www.mara.gov.au

At Oz Migration, all of our Migration Agents have over 10 years of post-qualification experience. Our team of specialists provide both individual and business services in the core areas of:

- Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visas (Subclass 482)
- Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) – Subclass 400 visas
- Permanent residency applications under the Employer Nomination Scheme -
- Subclass 186 visas (company supported)
- Permanent residency applications under Skilled Independent - Subclass 189
(non-company supported)
- Training – Subclass 407 visas
- Investor and Business Owner visas (high net worth individuals)
- Labour hire agreements (arrangements to allow your business to on-hire to third parties and unrelated entities)
- Partner, Parent and family-based visas

If you would like our team to undertake a visa assessment, please do not hesitate to contact our team at: info@ozmigration.net.au

……………………

Written by Caryn Spry.

Caryn is our Migration Co-ordinator, and has a wealth of experience in Human Resources/Global Mobility. Caryn has worked at Oz Migration for 3 years, and previously worked at a well-known global telecommunications company for over 10 years. 


Is migration a key driver to ensure economic prosperity?



The Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) has published a report which explores Australia’s migration program under the Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) 482 Visa, and its predecessor the 457 visas. The report focuses on hot topics, statistical data and interesting facts surrounding the Australian migration program.

How is the report useful? It enables the public to increase their understanding of Australia’s visa system, and assists businesses by promoting predictability & sustainability for the Australian economy. The report also increases the program’s exposure to political settlement, during a time where there has been challenges from both state and federal governments.

Some of the interesting facts taken from the report include:

  • Overall, TSS/457 visa holders tend to earn more than their permanent skilled counterparts and the overall Australian population. 42% earn a salary of $78,000 to $156,000 or more, with the average salary being $95,000. The pragmatists amongst us, would conclude that these skilled migrants, not only increases competition/skills levels amongst the industry, however it also increases the overall salary levels, thus living standards etc. 
  • With an Australian workforce of 12.8 million (data taken from ABS as of June 2019), there is approximately 154,000 (as of March 2019) TSS/457 visa holders. This figure represents less than 1% of the Australian workforce. Two-thirds of these visa holders reside in Sydney & Melbourne, and the top three citizenships are from the United Kingdom, India and the Philippines.
  • Skills shortages remain evident within key sectors. By way of example, CEDA’s research indicates Australia will need 18,000 more Cyber Security Specialists by 2026, when Australia only produces 500 graduates a year. This raises questions, whether segments of the program should be implemented using an individualistic approach, versus collectivism.

Overall, the report is a great read. It provides extrinsic motivations towards shaping Australia’s migration program, and addresses localised insecurities through transparency and non-sensationalism.

To download the full report, please visit:

https://www.ceda.com.au/Research-and-policy/All-CEDA-research/Research-catalogue/Effects-of-temporary-migration

………………………………………………

Written by Robert Lu.

Robert is the Immigration Manager at Oz Migration Solutions. He has been working in the industry for the last 12 years, passionate about immigration and a true believer in “Big Australia”.

MARN: 0848586